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DJ Screw Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 2010-023
Personal papers, photographs, creative material and technology, sound recordings, and promotional material comprise the DJ Screw Papers. DJ Screw’s activities as a DJ and mixtape creator are the focus of the papers, and materials documenting these activities include lists for his screw tapes, sound recordings, production materials, including recording equipment, business documents, and photographs. All materials were owned by DJ Screw and donated by his father, Robert Earl Davis, Sr., unless otherwise noted.

This collection includes materials containing personal, financial, and contact information for DJ Screw and his associates. Access to these original materials is restricted in order to protect privacy, but some materials have publicly-available surrogates filed in place of the originals.

Dates

  • 1975-2006
  • Majority of material found in 1994-2000

Creator

Conditions Governing Access:

Open for research. Some materials have been restricted for privacy reasons. Where possible, surrogates with sensitive information removed have been filed in place of the originals.

Conditions Governing Use:

Special Collections owns the physical items in our collections, but copyright normally belongs to the creator of the materials or their heirs. The researcher has full responsibility for determining copyright status, obtaining permission to publish from copyright holders, and abiding by current copyright laws when publishing or displaying copies of Special Collections material in print or electronic form. For more information, consult the appropriate librarian. Reproduction decisions will be made by Special Collections staff on a case-by-case basis.

Extent

4.00 Linear Feet

Biographical Information:

DJ Screw was born Robert Earl Davis, Jr. on July 20, 1971, and he began DJing and making mixtapes as a teenager while living on the Southside of Houston. By the early 1990s, Davis began to develop his innovative “chopped and screwed” technique of using recording technology to repeat phrases (a process known as chopping) and slow a song’s tempo (known as screwing). Davis became known as DJ Screw and distributed “screw tapes” featuring his technique.

As the popularity of the “chopped and screwed” technique grew, DJ Screw began to receive requests to make tapes tailored for friends and local rappers, often to celebrate an event such as a birthday. These tapes would include a selection of slowed down tracks, shoutouts by DJ Screw, and freestyles by rappers over the beats at the beginning and end of the tapes. To create the “chopped and screwed” effect on these tapes, DJ Screw simultaneously played two copies of the same record on a turntable and slowed each down using the turntable’s pitch control function. He then used the crossfader to switch between the records to repeat beats, words, and phrases. This process would create a master cassette. DJ Screw would then slow the tempo further by using a four-track’s pitch control function to manipulate the master cassettes and produce the final tape. He began selling copies of these “screw tapes” or “grey tapes” (so called because of their color) from his home.

The screw tapes helped to develop the careers of numerous local rappers, who would subsequently become known as the Screwed Up Click (S.U.C.). Prominent members of the S.U.C. included the Botany Boys, Fat Pat, HAWK, Lil’ Keke, E.S.G., Big Pokey, Big Moe, Lil’ O, Al-D, Yungstar, and Lil’ Flip. The music of the S.U.C. often addressed local culture, particularly the city’s custom car culture and the use of recreational drugs, especially marijuana and codeine.

DJ Screw achieved broader popularity in the mid-1990s, and he continued to sell tapes while releasing four studio albums on Bigtyme Recordz: “All Screwed Up,” “3 'N The Mornin' (Part One),” “3 'N The Mornin' (Part Two),” and “I Wanna Get High with Da Blanksta.” As a member of Dead End Alliance (D.E.A.) with Fat Pat, HAWK and Kay-K, he also appeared on the album “Screwed for Life.” In 1998, DJ Screw opened the store Screwed Up Records and Tapes in order to meet demand for his mixtapes.

On November 16, 2000, DJ Screw was found dead in his recording studio at the age of 29. His death was ruled an overdose of codeine and other drugs. The “chopped and screwed” genre that he created continues to influence recording artists, both locally and nationally, and his legacy is honored by fans around the world.

Sources:

DJ Screw: The Untold Story. Double Platinum - Come Fly With Me, 2006. DVD.

DJ Screw Photographs & Memorabilia Digital Collection description. University of Houston Digital Library. 20 March 2013. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/djscrew

Physical Characteristics and Technical Requirements:

Due to the fragility of the original screw tapes, they cannot be played directly. Digital copies of screw tapes 1-5 can be accessed in the Special Collections Reading Room. Contact curator Julie Grob (jgrob@uh.edu) for more information.

Digital Collections:

DJ Screw Photographs and Memorabilia digital collection

http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/djscrew

Separated Materials:

DJ Screw Sound Recordings

https://library.uh.edu/search/?searchtype=a&SORT=D&searcharg=DJ+Screw+Sound+Recordings&searchscope=11

Title
Guide to the DJ Screw Papers
Author
Alison Clemens
Date
2013-04-16
Language of description
English

Repository Details

Part of the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections Repository

Contact:
University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
MD Anderson Library
4333 University Drive
Houston TX 77204-2000 USA
713-743-9750