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Tatcho Mindiola Papers

 Collection
Identifier: 2015-012
This collection documents the academic career, community service and advocacy, and local civil rights activist work of Tatcho Mindiola, Professor Emeritus of Sociology and former director of the Center for Mexican American Studies. Materials include correspondence, course planning materials, research data, program files, published and unpublished manuscripts, and a significant amount of published reference material. Mindiola’s research includes in-depth interviews, on tapes and transcribed, as well as raw data, survey results, and studies produced by the Mexican American Studies Program, the precursor to the Center for Mexican American Studies. The collection includes early drafts of journal articles and conference papers, some with marginalia, produced by Mindiola; as well as collected conference papers from other individuals and reviewed articles for scholarly journals, such as AZTLAN, when Mindiola served as an editor. The collection also includes numerous correspondences and institutional papers of mostly CMAS, where Mindiola served as director, but also includes some for NACS when he served as president of the organization in the early 1990s, and when he served on MALDEF committees. The collection also includes correspondences between Mindiola and important civil rights and political leaders such as Jose Angel Gutiérrez, Maria Jimenez, Ben Luna, Al Luna, and Ramsey Muñiz. It also includes Chicana/o newsletters and ephemera from La Raza Unida and other items from El Movimiento, including political buttons, flyers, and bumper stickers. The collection contains photographs from Mindiola’s life, including milestones, conferences, and banquets.

Dates

  • 1970-2015

Creator

Conditions Governing Use

Special Collections owns the physical items in our collections, but copyright normally belongs to the creator of the materials or his/her heirs. The researcher has full responsibility for determining copyright status, locating copyright holders, and abiding by current copyright laws when publishing or displaying copies of Special Collections material in print or electronic form. For more information, consult the appropriate librarian. Photocopy decisions will be made by Special Collections staff on a case-by-case basis. Patrons are responsible for obtaining permission to publish from copyright holders.

Extent

50 Linear Feet

Overview

This collection documents the academic career, community service and advocacy, and local civil rights activist work of Tatcho Mindiola, Professor Emeritus of Sociology and former director of the Center for Mexican American Studies. Materials include correspondence, course planning materials, research data, program files, published and unpublished manuscripts, and a significant amount of published reference material.

Biographical / Historical

Anastacio ‘Tatcho’ Mindiola, Jr., associate professor of sociology at the University of Houston, director of the Center for Mexican American Studies, community activist, and an advocate for academic diversity, was born May 6, 1939 to Hortencia Rocha Mindiola and Anastacio Mindiola, Sr., in Houston, Texas. His father worked as a baker, while his mother stayed home to raise six children. He grew up in Houston’s Sunset Heights in the 1940s, a northern neighborhood in the Heights between 28th and 29th Street, where they were one of the first Mexican American families to move into the community. He attended Alamo Elementary, Hamilton Middle School, and graduated from John H. Reagan High School in 1957. Mindiola then enrolled in South Texas Junior College and after a short time left school and enlisted in the military. During his deployment overseas, his interest in higher education and political affairs increased as a result of influential conversations with fellow soldiers who were also college graduates. After his time in the military, Mindiola began his academic pursuits at the University of Houston in 1962 and studied business using the GI Bill to pay for his education. Because he had to work while going to school it took him over 5 years to earn his first degree; yet close to graduation he realized he did not care for a career in business. He returned to school and took social science courses, subsequently applying to the master’s program in Sociology. Mindiola graduated in 1970 from the University of Houston and continued his education, enrolling in the doctoral program at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1974, the University of Houston hired Mindiola, the first Mexican American faculty in the Sociology Department. While he worked on his dissertation, Mindiola taught classes at UH, where he helped to pioneer sociological studies on the Mexican American community in Houston, and developed unique courses also dealing with the working class, Mexican Americans, and other communities of color. Mindiola earned his Ph.D. from Brown University in 1978. At the end of the 1970s, Mindiola became embroiled in a long and tenuous battle over tenure, which ultimately ended in 1985, when he was finally granted the promotion. During this time, he was appointed as director of the Mexican American Studies Program, the precursor of the Center for Mexican American Studies, where he pushed for more office space, recruitment of Mexican American students and faculty, and pursued successful, yet controversial lobbying efforts to receive funding from the Texas Legislature in 1983, 1987, and again in 1990. Mindiola married Cynthia Mendoza in 1989. As a professor, Mindiola developed innovative courses in Mexican American Studies at the University of Houston, pursued new directions in sociological research including cross-cultural and comparative race studies, devoted great attention to the success of his students, and promoted service learning, combining pedagogical goals and community service. Through community outreach, he introduced the plight of Mexican American community into his academic scholarship to create working solutions to poverty, illiteracy, and crime. He presented papers at conferences around the country and published many of his findings in a wide-range of journals. Mindiola spent years doing extensive research on exit polls for local, state, and national elections, investigated black-brown relations, conducted a long-range homicide study, and a multi-year study of Mexican Americans in the Texas Legislature. He engaged academic interests towards the study of diverse communities; he pursued academic interests in the betterment of the Mexican American community in Houston. Under his tenure as the Center for Mexican American Studies (CMAS) director, Mindiola established programs, scholarships, and fellowships that resulted in increased numbers of Mexican American and low-income student enrollment in college. In the 1980s, CMAS established College Career Day at UH and to date has served over 30,000 low-income high school students; created the Visiting Scholars Program, one the longest running efforts at UH to increase diversity among the faculty, and to date over 40 professors have gone through the program with more than 40% were hired at UH; and established a publishing house in conjunction with Texas A&M Press. In the 1990s, CMAS founded the Graduate Fellowship Program, the Academic Achievers Program, and began sponsoring a scholarship banquet to raise funds to provide scholarships and fellowships. Over the years, CMAS brought in many speakers and hosted numerous conferences that addressed issues and concerns in the Mexican American and greater Latina/o community in Houston and throughout the United States.

Mindiola’s work as a community activist and advocate for academic diversity intertwined in his effort to raise public awareness of the Mexican American experience in Houston, he helped to bridge the academy to the community. After returning to Houston in 1974, Mindiola became involved in the local chapter of La Raza Unida Party. His political participation and community activism shaped his educational outlook. Mindiola also served in many community and national organizations, including the Hispanic Education Committee of Houston, as a member of the Board of Directors for Mexican American Legal Defense and Educational Forum, and as president of the National Association of Chicana/Chicano Studies. His work as a community activist and service in multiple organizations translated into his advocacy for diversity in the academy. At the higher education level, helped to sponsor the Mexican American Alumni Association at UH, he served on the Mexican American Task Force on Higher Education, and in the University of Houston-Latino Faculty Council. As a professor, director for CMAS, community activist and advocate for academic diversity he left a lasting impact on the University of Houston, and influenced many positive changes for the Mexican American community on the college campus. He retired in 2015.

Source: Debbie Z. Harwell, “Tatcho Mindiola, Jr.: A Visionary at the University of Houston,” Houston History, Vol. 9, No. 1 (Fall 2011): 36-37; Oral History Interview with Tatcho Mindiola by Jose Angel Gutiérrez, Tejano Voices 1997, CMAS No. 143a, http://library.uta.edu/tejanovoices/xml/CMAS_143a.xml; Oral History Interview with Tatcho Mindiola by Jose Angel Gutiérrez, Tejano Voices 1999, CMAS No. 143b, http://library.uta.edu/tejanovoices/xml/CMAS_143b.xml; Oral History Interview with Tatcho Mindiola by David Goldstein, Houston Oral History Project, June 4, 2008, http://digital.houstonlibrary.net/oral-history/tatcho-mindiola.php.

Custodial History

Donated by Tatcho Mindiola in September, 2008. Additional materials were acquired in January 2016 as part of a donation by CMAS.

Related Materials

UH Center for Mexican American Studies Records, 1972-2014
Title
Guide to the Tatcho Mindiola Papers
Status
in_progress
Author
Carlos Cantu, Elizabeth Cruces, Joseph Lueck, and Lyndon Kelley
Date
2018-12-17
Description rules
dacs
Language of description
English

Repository Details

Part of the University of Houston Libraries Special Collections Repository

Contact:
University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
MD Anderson Library
4333 University Drive
Houston TX 77204-2000 USA
713-743-9750